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This is my 1st time using Course Hero I am not sure how this works, I apologize if I am doing something wrong. I am working on a lab for my class in Computer Aided Manufacturing and I need some help creating a pseudo code for the following program "Traffic Control Lab Utilizing Word Comparison" I have attach a file and it is located on pages 27-33... Thank you!


Relay Logic

 

Introductory Lab

 


 

RSLogix Relay Logic Instructions

 

This exercise is designed to familiarize you with the operation of LogixPro and to step you

 

through the process of creating, editing and testing simple PLC programs utilizing the

 

Relay Logic Instructions supported by RSLogix.

 


 

From the Simulations Menu at the top of the screen, Select the I/O Simulation and ensure

 

that the User Instruction Bar shown above is visible.

 


 

The program editing window should contain a single rung. This is the End of Program rung

 

and is always the last rung in any program. If this is the only rung visible then your program

 

is currently empty.

 

If your program is not empty, then click on the File menu entry at the top of the screen and

 

select "New" from the drop-down list. A dialog box will appear asking for you to select a

 

Processor Type. Just click on "OK" to accept the default TLP LogixPro selection.

 


 

Now maximize the ProSim-II Simulation Window

 


 

RSLogix Program Creation

 

Collapse the I/O simulation screen back to it's normal size by clicking on the same (center)

 

button you used to maximize the simulation's window. You should now be able to see both

 


 

the simulation and program windows again. If you wish, you can adjust the relative size of

 

these windows by dragging the bar that divides them with your mouse.

 

I want you to now enter the following single run program which consists of a single Input

 

instruction (XIC - Examine If Closed) and a single Output instruction (OTE - Output

 

Energize). There's more than one way to accomplish this task, but for now I will outline

 

what I consider to be the most commonly used approach.

 


 

First click on the "New Rung" button in the User Instruction Bar. It's the first button on

 

the very left end of the Bar. If you hold the mousepointer over any of these buttons for a

 

second or two, you should see a short "ToolTip" which describes the function or name of

 

the instruction that the button represents.

 


 

You should now see a new Rung added to your program as shown above, and the Rung

 

number at the left side of the new rung should be highlighted. Note that the new Rung was

 

inserted above the existing (END) End Of Program Rung. Alternatively you could have

 

dragged (left mouse button held down) the Rung button into the program window and

 

dropped it onto one of the locating boxes that would have appeared.

 


 

Now click on the XIC instruction with your left mouse button (Left Click) and it will be

 

added to the right of your highlighted selection. Note that the new XIC instruction is now

 

selected (highlighted). Once again, you could have alternatively dragged and dropped the

 

instruction into the program window.

 

If you accidentally add an instruction which you wish to remove, just Left Click on

 

the instruction to select it, and then press the "Del" key on your keyboard.

 

Alternatively, you may right click on the instruction and then select "Cut" from the

 

drop-down menu that appears.

 


 

Left Click on the OTE output instruction and it will be. added to the right of your current

 

selection.

 


 

Double Click (2 quick left mousebutton clicks) on the XIC instruction and a textbox should

 

appear which will allow you to enter the address (I:1/0) of the switch we wish to monitor.

 


 

Use the Backspace key to get rid of the "?" currently in the textbox. Once you type in the

 

address, click anywhere else on the instruction (other than the textbox) and the box should

 

close.

 

Right Click on the XIC instruction and select "Edit Symbol" from the drop-down menu that

 

appears. Another textbox will appear where you can type in a name (Switch-0) to associate

 

with this address. As before, a click anywhere else will close the box.

 


 

Enter the address and symbol for the OTE instruction and your first RSLogix program will

 

now be complete. Before continuing however, Double check that the addresses of your

 

instructions are correct.

 


 

Testing your Program

 

It's now time to "Download" your program to the PLC. First click on the "Toggle" button at

 

the top right corner of the Edit Panel which will bring the PLC Panel into view.

 


 

Click on the "DownLoad" button to initiate the downloading of your program to the PLC.

 

Once complete, click inside the "RUN" option selection circle to start the PLC scanning.

 

Enlarge the Simulation window so that you can see both the Switches and Lamps, by

 

dragging the bar that separates the Simulation and Program windows to the right with your

 

mouse. Now click on Switch I:1/00 in the simulator and if all is well, Lamp O:2/00 should

 

illuminate.

 

Toggle the Switch On and Off a number of times and note the change in value indicated in

 

the PLC Panel's status boxes which are being updated constantly as the PLC Scans. Try

 

placing the PLC back into the "PGM" mode and then toggle the simulator's Switch a few

 

times and note the result. Place the PLC back into the "Run" mode and the Scan should

 

resume.

 

We are usually told to think of the XIC instruction as an electrical contact that allows

 

electrical flow to pass when an external switch is closed. We are then told that the OTE will

 

energize if the flow is allowed to get through to it. In actual fact the XIC is a conditional

 

instruction which tests any bit that we address for Truth or a 1.

 


 

Editing your Program

 


 

Click on the "Toggle" button of the PLC Panel which will put the PLC into the PGM mode

 

and bring the Edit Panel back into view.

 

Now add a second rung to your program as shown below. This time instead of entering the

 

addresses as you did before, try dragging the appropriate address which is displayed in the

 

I/O simulation and dropping it onto the instruction.

 

Note that the XIO instruction which Tests for Zero or False has it's address highlighted in

 

yellow. This indicates that the instruction is True, which in the case of an XIO, means that

 

the bit addressed is currently a Zero or False.

 


 

This is probably a good time to practice your dragNdrop skills. Try moving instructions from

 

rung to rung by holding the left mouse button down while over an instruction, and then

 

while keeping the mouse button down, move the mouse (and instruction) to a new location.

 

Try doing the same with complete rungs by dragging the box at the left end of the rung and

 

dropping it in a new location.

 

Once you feel comfortable with dragNdrop, ensure that your program once again looks like

 

the one pictured above, Now download your program to the PLC and place the PLC into

 

the Run Mode. Toggle both Switch-0 and Switch-1 on and off a number of times and

 

observe the effects this has on the lamps. Ensure that you are satisfied with the operation

 

of your program before proceeding further.

 


 

Stop/Start utilizing OTL and OTU

 

For this exercise we need two Normally Open momentary switches. Using your right

 

mouse button, click on switch "I:1/2" and "I:1/3", changing them to N.O. pushbuttons. Now

 

add the following two rungs to your program. Once you have the rungs entered correctly,

 

download and run your modified program.

 


 

Activate the Start and Stop switches and ensure that the OTL and OTU output instructions

 

are responding as outlined in your text. Once you have the lamp ON, could you turn it off if

 

power was lost in the Stop Switch circuit?

 

Now modify your program so that it operates correctly when you substitute the N.O. Stop

 

switch (I:1/03) with a Normally Closed Switch. If we now lost power on the N.C. Stop switch

 

circuit, what would happen to the state of Lamp (O:2/02)?

 


 

Emulating Standard Stop/Start Control

 

Erase your program by selecting "New" from the "File" menu selection at the top of the

 

screen. When the dialog box appears just click on "OK" to select the default PLC type. Now

 

enter the following program. To enter a branch, just drag the branch (button) onto the rung

 

and then insert or drag instructions into the branch.

 


 

Before you download and run this program, take a careful look at our use of a XIC

 

instruction to test the state of the N.C. Stop Switch. When someone presses the Stop

 

Switch, will bit I:1/04 go True or False? Will the XIC instruction go True or False when the

 

Switch is pressed? Is this the logic we are seeking in this case? .... Run the program and

 

see if you're right! .... If we loose power in the Stop Switch circuit, what state will the lamp

 

go to? .... Why do you think that most prefer this method rather than the OTL/OTU method

 

of implementing Stop/Start Control?

 


 

Output Branching with RSLogix

 

Modify your program so that it matches the following.

 


 

Download and Run the program. Operate the Stop and Start switches several times with

 

Switch-0 open, and again with Switch-0 closed. Remove the XIC instruction from the

 

Output branch and note what happens to Lamp-3 when you Start and Stop the circuit. Try

 

moving the Lamp-3 OTE instruction so that it is in series with the Lamp-2 OTE instruction.

 

Download, Run and observe how both lamps still light even with the empty branch (short?)

 

in place. It may look like an electrical circuit but in fact we know that it isn't and therefore

 

obeys a somewhat different set of rules. Remove the empty branch, Download, Run and

 

see if this has any effect on the logic or operation of the rung.

 


 

Controlling One Light from two Locations

 

Create, enter and test a program which will perform the common electrical function of

 

controlling a light from two different locations. Clear your program and utilize toggle switch

 

(I:1/00) and switch (I:1/01) to control Lamp (O:2/00)... (Hint: If both switches are On or if

 

both switches are Off, then the Lamp should be On! This of course is just one approach to

 

solving this problem)

 


 

Garage Door

 


 

Before Start Programming

 

Take the time to familiarize yourself with the components used in the Door system, and

 

take particular note of the current state of the limit switches. When the door is in the closed

 

position, both limit switches are in their activated state (Not Normal). Run your mouse over

 

each switch, and you should see a tool-tip text box appear, which denotes that the selected

 

switch is wired using a set of Normally Open contacts. With the door fully closed, what

 

signal level would you expect to see at the limit switch inputs I:03 and I:04? To confirm

 

your assessment of the current limit switch states, place the PLC into the RUN mode which

 

will initiate scanning. Now open the Data Table display by clicking on the Data Table icon

 

located on the toolbar (3rd from right) at the top of the screen.

 

When you have the Data Table showing, select the "Input Table" from the drop down Table

 

list box. You should now be able to see the current state of each bit associated with input

 

card I:1. You should also note that bit I:02 is also in a High or True state. Use your mouse

 

to press the Stop switch on the Control Panel a few times, and note the results. Don't

 

continue on with the exercise until you are confident that you understand the rational of the

 

observed results.

 


 

Student Programming Exercise #1:

 

In this exercise we want you to apply your knowledge of Relay Logic Instructions to design

 

a program which will control the garage door. The Door System includes a Reversible

 

Motor, a pair of Limit Switches and a Control Panel, all connected to your PLC. The

 

program you create will monitor and control this equipment while adhering to the following

 

criteria:

 


 


 

In this exercise the Open and Close pushbuttons will be used to control the

 

movement of the door. Movement will not be maintained when either switch is

 

released, and therefore the Stop switch is neither required nor used in this

 

exercise. However, all other available Inputs and Outputs are employed in this

 

exercise.

 


 


 


 

Pressing the Open Switch will cause the door to move upwards (open) if not

 

already fully open. The opening operation will continue as long as the switch is

 

held down. If the switch is released, or if limit switch LS1 opens, the door

 

movement will halt immediately.

 


 


 


 

Pressing the Close Switch will cause the door to move down (close) if not already

 

fully closed. The closing operation will continue as long as the switch is held down.

 

If the switch is released, or if limit switch LS2 closes, the door movement will halt

 

immediately.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is already fully opened, Pressing the Open Switch will Not energize the

 

motor.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is already fully closed, Pressing the Close Switch will Not energize the

 

motor.

 


 


 


 

Under no circumstance will both motor windings be energized at the same time.

 


 


 


 

The Open Lamp will be illuminated if the door is in the Fully Open position.

 


 


 


 

The Shut Lamp will be illuminated if the door is in the Fully Closed position.

 


 

It is your responsibility to fully design, document, debug, and test your Program. Avoid the

 

use of OTL or OTU latching instructions, and make a concerted effort to minimize the

 

number of rungs employed.

 

Ensure that you have made effective use of both instruction and rung comments to clearly

 

document your program. All I/O components referenced within your program should be

 

clearly labeled, and rung comments should be employed to add additional clarity as

 

required.

 

Draw flow chart, input and output table to your lab notebook.

 


 

Student Programming Exercise #2:

 

In this exercise we want you to apply your knowledge of Relay Logic Instructions to design

 

a program which will maintain the appropriate door movement once initiated by the

 

operator. The Opening or Closing operation of the door will continue to completion even if

 

the operator releases the pushbutton which initiated the movement. The program will

 

adhere to the following criteria:

 


 


 

Door movement will halt immediately when the Stop Switch is initially pressed, and

 

will remain halted if the switch is released.

 


 


 


 

Pressing the Open Switch will cause the door to Open if not already fully open. The

 

opening operation will continue to completion even if the switch is released.

 


 


 


 

Pressing the Close Switch will cause the door to Close if not already fully shut. The

 

closing operation will continue to completion even if the Switch is released.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is already fully opened, Pressing the Open Switch will Not energize the

 

motor.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is already fully closed, Pressing the Close Switch will Not energize the

 

motor.

 


 


 


 

Under no circumstance will both motor windings be energized at the same time.

 


 


 


 

The Ajar Lamp will be illuminated if the door is NOT in either the fully closed or fully

 

opened position.

 


 


 


 

The Open Lamp will be illuminated if the door is in the Fully Open position.

 


 


 


 

The Shut Lamp will be illuminated if the door is in the Fully Closed position.

 


 

It is your responsibility to fully design, document, debug, and test your Program. Avoid the

 

use of OTL or OTU latching instructions, and make a concerted effort to minimize the

 

number of rungs employed.

 

As before, ensure that you have made effective use of both instruction and rung comments

 

to clearly document your program.

 


 

Student Programming Exercise #3:

 

In this exercise we want to introduce you to a simple programming technique for adding a

 

bit of "Flash" to your program. We want you to make use of the PLC's Free Running Timer

 

which can be viewed in the Data Table Display at location S2:4. This integer word contains

 

a count which is incremented continuously by the PLC when it is in the Run mode, and it

 

can come in quite handy at times for variety of purposes. In this exercise we want you to

 


 

utilize this word as follows:

 

With the PLC in the Run mode, Display word S2:4 utilizing the Data Table display. Ensure

 

that the Radix is set to Binary so that you can view the individual bits within the word. You

 

should see a binary count in progress where the rate of change of each bit is directly

 

related to it's position within the word. Bit 0 will have the highest rate, while Bit 1 will be 1/2

 

as fast as Bit 0, and Bit 2 half as fast as 1 etc. etc.

 

We want you to add a Lamp Flasher to your program by monitoring the state of one of

 

these bits with an XIC instruction. I'm going to suggest using Bit 4 for this purpose, but

 

depending upon the speed of your computer you may elect to substitute another Bit. With

 

an actual AB PLC, the rate is consistent, but with LogixPro it varies from computer to

 

computer.

 

Place an XIC instruction addressed to S:4/4 on the rung which controls either the Open or

 

Shut Lamp in your previous program. Now download and Run this modified program to see

 

the flashing effect achieved. The Lamp should flash at a reasonable rate whenever your

 

program energizes the selected Lamp.

 

Now modify your program so that the following criteria is met:

 


 


 

If the Door is fully open, the Open lamp will be energized but not flashing as was

 

the case before.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is opening, the Open lamp will flash while the door is in motion.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is fully closed, the Shut lamp will be energized but not flashing as was

 

the case before.

 


 


 


 

If the Door is closing, the Shut lamp will flash while the door is in motion.

 


 


 


 

The Ajar Lamp will flash if the door is stationary, and is not in the fully open or fully

 

closed position. The Ajar Lamp will flash at a slower rate (1/4) then the other

 

lamps.

 


 


 


 

The Ajar Lamp will be illuminated in a steady state if the door is in motion.

 


 

As before, ensure that you have made effective use of both instruction and rung comments

 

to clearly document your program.

 


 

Supplemental Programming Exercise #4:

 

We do not recommend proceeding with this exercise if you do not have an instructor or

 

experienced PLC programmer to call upon for assistance.

 

In this exercise we want you to modify your program so that it adheres to this additional

 


 

criteria:

 


 


 

If the door is currently opening, pressing the Close Switch will immediately halt

 

movement. Door movement will remain halted when the switch is released.

 


 


 


 

If the door is currently closing, pressing the Open Switch will immediately halt

 

movement. Door movement will remain halted when the switch is released.

 


 


 


 

Once movement is halted by the either of the foregoing actions, the operating

 

criteria associated with the previous exercise will again take effect.

 


 


 


 

The utilization of Binary or Integer Table bits to Flag specific conditions within your

 

program would be appropriate. Also, the retentive OTL and OTU instructions may

 

be utilized freely at your discretion.

 


 

For Discussion and/or Research:

 

The door simulation employs 2 limit switches that have both been wired N.O. (Normally

 

Open). This might not be the best choice in wiring an actual door control installation, but

 

we have learned that simple wiring irregularities such as this can be readily overcome

 

within one's ladder logic program...... But,,, should we do this?... OR,,, should we rewire?

 

Upper Limit switch wired N.O., Lower limit switch wired N.O. resulting in:

 

Upper limit switch (door open) goes False(0) when the door reaches the fully

 

open position.

 

Lower limit switch (door closed) goes True(1) when the door reaches the fully

 

closed position.

 

The above truth table may offend one's sense of logic, and many might argue that it would

 

be worthwhile to rewire the upper limit switch so that it is N.C. rather then N.O. The result

 

would be that this switched input would then go True rather then False when the position it

 

is detecting (door open) is reached. This in-turn should make one's final program easier to

 

read, understand, and even troubleshoot.

 

Upper Limit switch rewired N.C., Lower limit switch wired N.O. resulting in:

 

Upper limit switch (door open) goes True(1) when Door reaches the fully open

 

position.

 

Lower limit switch (door closed) goes True(1) when door reaches the fully

 

closed position.

 

Sensible!....But!.....

 

Although rewiring the upper switch to N.C. does appear to make greater "logical" sense, it

 

would actually result in an inferior installation. Rewiring one of the limit switches may still

 

be worthwhile, but it's the lower limit switch that we should be concerned with.

 

Upper Limit switch wired N.O., Lower limit switch rewired N.C. resulting in:

 

Upper limit switch (door open) goes False(0) when Door reaches the fully open

 


 

position.

 

Lower limit switch (door closed) goes False(0) when door reaches the fully

 

closed position.

 

Task> Explain why this last rewiring option would result in a safer, more fault

 

tolerant installation.

 

Hint: Which common electrical fault (short or open) is the more likely to go un-noticed, and

 

how should this influence our selection of switch type (N.O. or N.C.) when designing/wiring

 

Motor Control Stop Circuits?

 


 

......

 


 

Lab # 3

 


 

RSLogix Timers

 


 

The objective of this lab is to learn how to use timers for MicroLogix 1000 PLC. Timers are

 

one of the essential PLC functions that controls on and off outputs based on time. AB PLCs

 

have Timer On Delay (TON), Timer Off Delay (TOF) and Retentive Timer On (RTO). Each

 

timer has different on and off timings and you have to make yourself familiar with use of

 

each timer.

 

The TON Timer .... (Timer ON Delay)

 


 


 


 

Enter the following program being careful to enter the addresses exactly as shown.

 

Confirm that you have entered the number 100 as the timer's preset value. This

 

value represents a 10 second timing interval (10x0.1) as the timebase is fixed at

 

0.1 seconds:

 


 


 


 

Once you have your program entered, and have ensured that it is correct,

 

download it to the PLC.

 

Ensure that Switch I:1/0 is Open, and then place the PLC into the Run mode.

 

Note the initial value of timer T4:1's accumulator and preset in the spaces below.

 

Also indicate the state of each of the timer's control bits in the spaces provided:

 


 


 


 


 

Initial State (Switch I:1/0=Open):

 

T4:1.ACC = _____ T4:1.PRE = ______ T4:1/EN = ____ T4:1/TT = ____ T4:1/DN =

 

____

 


 


 

Close switch I:1/0, and carefully observe the incrementing of the timer's

 

accumulator, and the state of each of it's control bits.

 


 


 


 

Once the Timer stops incrementing, note the final value of timer T4:1's

 

accumulator, preset, and the state of it's control bits below:

 

Final State (Switch I:1/0=Closed):

 

T4:1.ACC = _____ T4:1.PRE = ______ T4:1/EN = ____ T4:1/TT = ____ T4:1/DN =

 

____

 


 


 


 


 

Toggle the state of switch I:1/0 a number of times, and observe the operation of

 

the Timer in both the DataTable display and in the Ladder Rung program display.

 

Confirm that when the rung is taken false, the accumulator and all 3 control bits are

 

reset to zero. This type of timer is a non-retentive instruction, in that the truth of the

 

rung can cause the accumulator and control bits to be reset (=0).

 

Conclusions:

 

Use the TON instruction to turn an output on or off after the timer has been on for a

 

preset time interval. This output instruction begins timing when its rung goes "true".

 

It waits the specified amount of time (as set in the PREset), keeps track of the

 

accumulated intervals which have occurred (ACCumulator), and sets the DN

 

(done) bit when the ACC (accumulated) time equals the PRESET time.

 

As long as rung conditions remain true, the timer adjusts its accumulated value

 

(ACC) each evaluation until it reaches the preset value (PRE). The accumulated

 

value is reset when rung conditions go false, regardless of whether the timer has

 

timed out.

 


 

Cascaded TON Timers

 


 


 

Insert a new rung containing a second timer just below the first rung as shown

 

below. This second timer T4:2 will be enabled when the first timer's Done bit

 

T4:1/DN goes true or high (1).

 


 


 


 

Once you have completed this addition to your program, download your program to

 

the PLC and select RUN.

 

Toggle the state of switch I:1/0 to ON and observe the operation of the timers in

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

your program.

 

Bring the DataTable display into view, and pay particular attention to the way in

 

which the timers are cascaded (one timer starts the next).

 

Try changing the value of one of the timer presets by double clicking on the preset

 

value in the DataTable display, and then entering a new value.

 

Run the timers through their timing sequence a number of times. Don't move on

 

until you are satisfied that the timers are working as you would expect

 

In this exercise we have utilized just two timers, but there is nothing stopping us

 

from sequencing as many timers as we wish. The only thing to remember is; to use

 

the DN (done) bit of the previous timer to enable the next timer in the sequence.

 

Obviously locating the timers on consecutive rungs, and employing consecutive

 

numbering will make such a program much easier to read and trouble-shoot.

 


 

Self Resetting Timers

 


 


 

Place the PLC into the PGM mode, and modify the first rung of your program as

 

depicted below.

 


 


 


 

Once you have modified your program, download it to the PLC and place the PLC

 

into the RUN mode.

 

Close switch I:1/0 and observe the operation of the timers. The timers should now

 

be operating in a continuous loop with Timer1 starting Timer2, and then when

 

Timer2 is done, Timer1 is reset by Timer2's done bit. As before, when Timer1 is

 

reset, it in turn resets Timer2 which causes Timer2's d...

 


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